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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

6 edition of Byzantine slavery and the Mediterranean world found in the catalog.

Byzantine slavery and the Mediterranean world

Youval Rotman

Byzantine slavery and the Mediterranean world

by Youval Rotman

  • 301 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by Harvard University Press in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Slavery -- Byzantine Empire -- History,
  • Slaves -- Byzantine Empire -- History,
  • Byzantine Empire -- Social conditions,
  • Byzantine Empire -- History -- 527-1081,
  • Mediterranean Region -- History -- 476-1517

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Youval Rotman ; translated by Jane Marie Todd.
    ContributionsTodd, Jane Marie, 1957-
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHT865 .R6713 2009
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23191827M
    ISBN 109780674036116
    LC Control Number2009009042

    The University of Chicago Press. Books Division. Chicago Distribution Center. Byzantine Slavery and the Mediterranean World. Harvard University Press. p. ISBN ^ Daily Life in the Byzantine Empire, Marcus Louis Rautman, page 22 ^ a b Cameron, Averil (). The Byzantines. John Wiley & Sons. p. ISBN

      Sklavenos has no connotation of slavery in medieval Greek. For a short and solid (if unsatisfying, but only because of the state of research) on medieval Roman slavery, see: G. Prinzing, “On Slaves and Slavery” in The Byzantine World, ed. Paul Stephenson (Routledge: London and New York, ), pp.   Stefan Esders, Yitzhak Hen, et. al., The Merovingian Kingdoms and the Mediterranean World: Revisiting the Sources. London: Bloomsbury, Since the posthumous publication of Henri Pirenne’s Mohammed and Charlemagne in , scholars of late antiquity and the early Middle Ages have found the “Pirenne Thesis” a provocative hypothesis on the economic and cultural history of the.

      “Slavery” outside the Slave Trade The Movement and Status of Captives between Byzantine Calabria and the Islamic World In: Transmitting and Circulating the Late Antique and Byzantine Worlds. _Memory and the Mediterranean_ is a previously unpublished book by French historian Fernand Braudel, one written in the s and originally intended to be part of a larger series. Set aside with the death of the author's longtime friend and editor, Albert Skira and the collapse of the project, the book was only published for the first time in /5(32).


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Byzantine slavery and the Mediterranean world by Youval Rotman Download PDF EPUB FB2

It is a troubling paradox, and one this book addresses by considering a period in which the definition of slavery Byzantine slavery and the Mediterranean world book freedom proved considerably flexible.

Between more familiar forms of slavery—those of antiquity and of the Americas—the institution as it was practiced and theorized in the Byzantine Mediterranean was of a different nature. It is a troubling paradox, and one this book addresses by considering a period in which the definition of slavery and freedom proved considerably flexible.

Between more familiar forms of slavery―those of antiquity and of the Americas―the institution as it was practiced and theorized in the Byzantine Mediterranean was of a different by: Looking at the Byzantine concept of slavery within the context of law, the labour market, medieval politics, and religion, the author illustrates how these contexts both reshaped and sustained the slave market.

(PDF) Byzantine Slavery and the Mediterranean World | youval rotman - Slavery may no longer exist as a legal institution, but we still find many forms of non-freedom in contemporary societies. It is a troubling paradox, and one this book addresses by considering a period in which the definition of slavery and freedom.

It is a troubling paradox, and one this book addresses by considering a period in which the definition of slavery and freedom proved considerably flexible. Between more familiar forms of.

The last three chapters are a virtual primer on Byzantine slavery, whose full value cannot be covered in a brief review. Rotman explicates the alteration of the nature of slavery in the Mediterranean world as a result of piracy and the near perpetual Byzantine-Muslim warfare, especially with the phenomenon of the exchange of captives, while giving great attention to the Mediterranean slave.

Between more familiar forms of slavery-those of antiquity and of the Americas-the institution as it was practiced and theorized in the Byzantine Mediterranean was of a different g at the Byzantine concept of slavery within the context of law, the labor market, medieval politics, and religion, Youval Rotman illustrates how these contexts both reshaped and sustained the slave market.

Slavery was common in the early Roman Empire and Classical was legal in the Byzantine Empire but became rare after the first half of 7th century. From 11th century, semi-feudal relations largely replaced slavery.

Under the influence of Christianity, a shift in the view of slavery is noticed, which by the 10th century transformed the slave from property or chattel (i.e. the slave as. Byzantine Slavery and the Mediterranean World.

(Originally published in French ; translated by Jane Marie Todd) [For a response to this review by Youval Rotman, please see BMCR ] This book is an English translation of Youval Rotman’s previously published Paris dissertation, (). Byzantine Slavery and the Mediterranean World (review), Journal of World History | DeepDyve Byzantine Slavery and the Mediterranean World (review) Hoffman, Richard J.

(Richard Joseph) Journal of World History, Volume 22 (4) – While the apostle Paul might have called himself a slave (doulos) of Christ, the metaphor would have been ironic for the Stoic philosopher and erstwhile slave Epictetus.

In Byzantine Slavery and the Mediterranean World Youval Rotman picks up the thread of imperial Roman slavery by tracing its development in medieval Byzantium.

It is a troubling paradox, and one this book addresses by considering a period in which the definition of slavery and freedom proved considerably flexible. Between more familiar forms of slavery--those of antiquity and of the Americas--the institution as it was practiced and theorized in the Byzantine Mediterranean was of a different nature.

Apparently there is a book "Byzantine Slavery and the Mediterranean World", but I am not (yet) interested in the topic enough to go through trouble of buying that book, and I'm not sure whether it covers the wider context of Mediterranean slave trade or focuses only on Byzantine Empire (a topic that I am somewhat familiar with).

Byzantine Slavery and the Mediterranean World, Jane Marie Todd, The American Historical Review, VolumeIssue 5, DecemberPages –, This is an important and interesting book and, as the first monograph on Byzantine slavery to be published sincea much-needed one.

↑ Youval Rotman, "Byzantine Slavery and the Mediterranean World", transl. by Jane Marie Todd, Cambridge, Massachusetts – London, Harvard University Press Book presentation in a) Nikolaos Linardos (University of Athens), Mediterranean Chronicle 1 () pp., b) Alice Rio, American Historical Review, Vol.Issue 5,   In his review of chapter three, “Slavery, a Component of a Medieval Society,” Lenski challenges my interpretation of the evidence for the use of slaves in the Byzantine countryside.

There are indeed only five documents for a period of four centuries. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Byzantine Slavery and the Mediterranean World at Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users.

Unfortunately, the most recent book on Byzantine slavery by Rotman is not particularly great Byzantine Slavery and the Mediterranean World. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, M. mariusj. Ad Honorem. Aug 2, Los Angeles #8 Medieval said.

And The Mediterranean World Sale. Wide inventory of And The Mediterranean World for sale. Pick the best And The Mediterranean World to suit your need at wholesale deals - We have an amazing selection of And The Mediterranean World for sale from leading brands from Ebay.

In the Byzantine Empire and the Islamic Empire, slavery was prevalent, as in many other empires before, during, and after these empires fell from their once great heights.

In the Codex Justinianus, the collection of Byzantine laws organized by Emperor Justinian, the legality of runaway slaves and what to do with them is outlined. It is a troubling paradox, and one this book addresses by considering a period in which the definition of slavery and freedom proved considerably flexible.

Between more familiar forms of slavery—those of antiquity and of the Americas—the institution as it was practiced and theorized in the Byzantine Mediterranean was of a different nature.Buy Byzantine Slavery and the Mediterranean World by Youval Rotman, Jane Marie Todd from Waterstones today!

Click and Collect from your local Waterstones .Slavery. Slavery was a strategic and very important part of all Mediterranean societies during the Middle Ages. The threat of becoming a slave was a constant fear for peasants, fishermen and merchants.

Those with money or who had financial backing only feared the lack of support, should they be threatened with abduction for ransom.